Indiana State Service Dog Laws

The Indiana Law can be found here. Please expand the sections below to read the full text related to service animals.

Important points:

Summary – Service Dogs in Training are allowed in public places with a service animal trainer.

Detailed – Health § 16-32-3-2 (d) A service animal trainer, while engaged in the training process of a service animal, is entitled to access to any public accommodation granted by this section.

Sec. 5.  (a) As used in this section, “service animal” has the meaning set forth in IC 35-46-3-11.5.

(b) A voter who requires the assistance of a service animal is entitled to bring the animal into the polls and the voting booth.

Sec. 21. A person who drives a vehicle shall yield the right-of-way to a blind pedestrian carrying a clearly visible white cane or accompanied by a guide dog.
Sec. 1.5. As used in this chapter, “service animal” refers to an animal trained as:

(1) a hearing animal;

(2) a guide animal;

(3) an assistance animal;

(4) a seizure alert animal;

(5) a mobility animal;

(6) a psychiatric service animal;  or

(7) an autism service animal.

Sec. 2. (a) As used in this section, “public accommodation” means an establishment that caters or offers services, facilities, or goods to the general public.

(b) A person who:

(1) is totally or partially blind;

(2) is deaf or hard of hearing;  or

(3) has a physical or mental disability;

is entitled to be accompanied by a service animal, especially trained for the purpose, in any public accommodation without being required to pay an extra charge for the service animal.  However, the person is liable for any damage done to the accommodation by the service animal.

(c) A person who:

(1) refuses access to a public accommodation;  or

(2) charges a fee for access to a public accommodation;

to a person who is totally or partially blind, who is deaf or hard of hearing, or who has a physical or mental disability, because that person is accompanied by a service animal commits a Class C infraction.

(d) A service animal trainer, while engaged in the training process of a service animal, is entitled to access to any public accommodation granted by this section.

Sec. 9.5. As used in this chapter, “service animal” refers to an animal trained as:

(1) a hearing animal;

(2) a guide animal;

(3) an assistance animal;

(4) a seizure alert animal;

(5) a mobility animal;

(6) a psychiatric service animal;  or

(7) an autism service animal.

Sec. 20. (a) The prohibition against discrimination in section 19 of this chapter includes medical examinations and inquiries.  Except as otherwise provided by this section, a covered entity may not conduct a medical examination or make inquiries of a job applicant as to whether the applicant is an individual with a disability or as to the nature or severity of a disability.

(b) A covered entity may make preemployment inquiries into the ability of an applicant to perform job related functions.

(c) A covered entity may require a medical examination after an offer of employment has been made to a job applicant and before the commencement of the employment duties of the applicant and may condition an offer of employment on the results of that examination if:

(1) all entering employees are subjected to the examination regardless of disability;

(2) information obtained regarding the medical condition or history of the applicant is collected and maintained on separate forms and in separate medical files and is treated as a confidential medical record, except that:

(A) supervisors and managers may be informed regarding necessary restrictions on the work or duties of the employee and necessary accommodations;

(B) first aid and safety personnel may be informed, when appropriate, if the disability might require emergency treatment;  and

(C) government officials investigating compliance with this chapter shall be provided relevant information on request;  and

(3) the results of the examination are used only in accordance with this chapter.

(d) A covered entity may not require a medical examination and may not make inquiries of an employee as to whether the employee is an individual with a disability or as to the nature or severity of the disability, unless the examination or inquiry is shown to be job related and consistent with business necessity.

(e) A covered entity may conduct voluntary medical examinations, including voluntary medical histories, that are part of an employee health program available to employees at that work site.  A covered entity may make inquiries into the ability of an employee to perform job related functions.  Information obtained under this subsection is subject to the requirements of subsection (c)(2) and (c)(3).

(f) A covered entity may not interfere, directly or indirectly, with the use of an animal that has been or is being specially trained as a service animal.

(g) A covered entity may not refuse to permit an employee with a disability to keep a service animal with the employee at all times in the place of employment.

Sec. 5. A person renting, leasing, or providing real property for compensation shall not refuse to accept a person with a disability as a tenant due to the fact that the person with a disability has a guide dog that assists the person with a disability in overcoming a particular disability.
Sec. 1. As used in this chapter, “animal” refers to a:

(1) law enforcement animal;  or

(2) service animal.

Sec. 6. As used in this chapter, “service animal” refers to an animal trained as:

(1) a hearing animal;

(2) a guide animal;

(3) an assistance animal;

(4) a seizure alert animal;

(5) a mobility animal;

(6) a psychiatric service animal;  or

(7) an autism service animal.

Sec. 11.5. (a) As used in this section, “service animal” means an animal that a person who is impaired by:

(1) blindness or any other visual impairment;

(2) deafness or any other aural impairment;

(3) a physical disability;  or

(4) a medical condition;

relies on for navigation, assistance in performing daily activities, or alert signals regarding the onset of the person’s medical condition.

(b) A person who knowingly or intentionally:

(1) interferes with the actions of a service animal;  or

(2) strikes, torments, injures, or otherwise mistreats a service animal;

while the service animal is engaged in assisting an impaired person described in subsection (a) commits a Class A misdemeanor.

(c) An offense under subsection (b)(2) is a Level 6 felony if the act results in the:

(1) serious permanent disfigurement;

(2) unconsciousness;

(3) permanent or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member or organ;  or

(4) death;

of the service animal.

(d) It is a defense that the accused person:

(1) engaged in a reasonable act of training, handling, or disciplining the service animal;  or

(2) reasonably believed the conduct was necessary to prevent injury to the accused person or another person.